Ponder the Word, Ponder the Future

by Marcia Lee Laycock, @MarciaLaycock

We call ourselves writers of faith, and that is a label to wear proudly, but as we head into a new year perhaps it’s worth pondering some of the scriptures in which God refers to us and tells us how much He loves us.This is how He sees those who serve Him–

Galatians 4:7 – So you are no longer a slave, but a son (or daughter) … God has made you also an heir.

Hebrews 2:11 – Both the one who makes men holy and those who are made holy are of the same family. So Jesus is not ashamed to call them brothers (and sisters).

John 15:15 – I no longer call you servants, because a servant does not know his master’s business. Instead, I have called you friends, for everything that I learned from my Father I have made known to you.

1 Peter 2:5 – You also, like living stones, are being built into a spiritual house to be a holy priesthood, offering spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.

Ephesians 2:10 – For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.

John 20:29 – … blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.

Romans 4:7 – Blessed are those whose transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered.

Matthew 5:14 – You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden.

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Isaiah 43:12 – I have revealed and saved and proclaimed— I, and not some foreign god among you. You are my witnesses, declares the LORD, that I am God.

Psalm 1:3 – That person is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season and whose leaf does not wither— whatever they do prospers.

Isaiah 62:5 – As a young man marries a young woman, so will your Builder marry you; as a bridegroom rejoices over his bride, so will your God rejoice over you.

John 16:27 – No, the Father himself loves you because you have loved me and have believed that I came from God.

John 14:20 – On that day you will realize that I am in my Father, and you are in me, and I am in you.

Deuteronomy 33:12 – … the one the LORD loves rests between His shoulders.

Jeremiah 31:3 – I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you with unfailing kindness.

John 15:9 – As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love.

Romans 8:37 – No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

And finally – 2 Thessalonians 2:16, 17 – May our Lord Jesus Christ himself and God our Father, who loved us and by his grace gave us eternal encouragement and good hope,encourage your hearts and strengthen you in every good deed and word.

In every good deed and in every good word, may we go boldly into this next year, rejoicing in Him, proclaiming His glory.


One Smooth Stone

Desperate to escape his past, the police, and especially, God, Alex Donnelly picks a good place to hide – the Yukon wilderness – but he finds even there he is pursued. What will it take for him to discover that no matter how far you run, God will find you, and no matter what you have done, God will forgive you?

Marcia Lee Laycock writes from central Alberta Canada where she is a pastor’s wife and mother of three adult daughters. She was the winner of The Best New Canadian Christian Author Award for her novel, One Smooth Stone. The sequel, A Tumbled Stone was shortlisted in The Word Awards. Marcia also has four devotional books in print and has contributed to several anthologies. Her work has been endorsed by Sigmund Brouwer, Janette Oke, Phil Callaway and Mark Buchanan.

 

Post Christmas, Post Publication

by Marcia Lee Laycock, @MarciaLaycock

Well, it’s all over for another year. If you’re anything like me, I always feel a little bit let down just after Christmas. It’s not that I didn’t enjoy the season, but that somehow, after all the anticipation, the reality just never seems to hit the mark.

I have had similar reactions after finishing a book manuscript. Typing ‘The End’ is thrilling but there’s always that niggling thought, ‘oh no, now what? ’We all know the work of publishing a novel does not stop when the writing is done. That’s just the first mountain to climb. Then there’s all the marketing and promotion that needs to be done and most of us dread it.

I’ve been in that camp for some time. Like many writers, I just want to write. I don’t want to be bothered with all that marketing stuff. But recently I’ve been trying to adjust my attitude. I was listening to an audio track about marketing and one line struck me – “Want reviews and endorsements? Then be a reviewer and an endorser.” Since hearing that quote I’ve tried to think of all the promotion and marketing as just another way to give. When I send out newsletters to my email list I try to think of ways to bless them, not just ways to entice them to buy my books. When I post notices on forums and Facebook about my books I try to think of my work as a gift to those who might need my words in some way, not just as a means to rack up the likes and raise my Amazon ranks. When I began thinking of it this way the process was suddenly much more enjoyable.

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It astonished me that I have not followed this path before. But then, we are self-focused beings. Giving is not always our first inclination, so it’s something we have to be trained to do, like little children who must be taught to share their toys.A humbling thought, isn’t it? Thanks be to God that we don’t have to completely rely on our own nature, because there is One living in us who will guide and direct, even in this. As 2 Corinthians 12:9 tells us, in our weakness we are made strong as we turn to Him and rely on His wisdom and grace. As we abide in Him, he provides all that we need to accomplish His purposes in our lives, even down to the details of our marketing strategies.

Isaiah 58:11 says, “The Lord will guide you always; he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land and will strengthen your frame. You will be like a well-watered garden, like a spring whose waters never fail.”

I love that picture of the sweet spring waters gushing forth without fail. I imagined it as a geyser of words, flowing out into the world to help in the building of God’s kingdom on earth.

And suddenly, those post-Christmas and post-publication blues are fading fast.


One Smooth Stone

Desperate to escape his past, the police, and especially, God, Alex Donnelly picks a good place to hide – the Yukon wilderness – but he finds even there he is pursued. What will it take for him to discover that no matter how far you run, God will find you, and no matter what you have done, God will forgive you?

Marcia Lee Laycock writes from central Alberta Canada where she is a pastor’s wife and mother of three adult daughters. She was the winner of The Best New Canadian Christian Author Award for her novel, One Smooth Stone. The sequel, A Tumbled Stone was shortlisted in The Word Awards. Marcia also has four devotional books in print and has contributed to several anthologies. Her work has been endorsed by Sigmund Brouwer, Janette Oke, Phil Callaway and Mark Buchanan.

Irritated by My Own Writing

by Marcia Lee Laycock, @MarciaLaycock

Gustave Flaubert is quoted as saying: “I am irritated by my own writing. I am like a violinist whose ear is true but whose fingers refuse to reproduce precisely the sound he hears.”

I think most writers, and artists of all kinds, will relate to that sentiment. I know I do. I remember when I received the email from my publisher telling me that my first novel, One Smooth Stone, had gone to press. My first thought was, “No! Give it back! It’s not good enough yet!” My vision for that book was so much more than what it ended up being.Often I feel the same about the devotional writing I do. I sense something deeply but the expression of it seems lacking. It always seems to fall short and I fear that its impact will not be as effective as I had dreamed it would be.

I am so very thankful that the impact of my words is not just dependent upon my skill as a writer. I can depend on the Holy Spirit to do His work in the minds and hearts of those who read my writing. I can relax in the knowledge that His plan is perfect and His purposes will be accomplished through my work. I can rejoice in the understanding that it is God who changes lives, not my paltry efforts at eloquence.

I think most Christians will relate to Mr. Flaubert’s statement as well. None of us feels that we are good enough. We know our weaknesses, our tendency to fall into sin and to wander away from the One who wants to hold us close. Mr. Flaubert’s quote might well be transposed to read, “The Spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak” (Matt. 26:41), or, “I do believe, help me overcome my unbelief” (Mark 9:24),or, “I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate, I do” (Romans 7:15).

As writers, artists and Christians we are constantly reminded that we are not yet living in the state in which we were meant to live. We glimpse what ought to be but cannot yet attain it. We wrestle with our demons and our angels. Sometimes we come away greatly strengthened. Sometimes we are limping. Yet every time we understand on a deeper level, that, in our weakness we are strong, because in our weakness we learn to depend solely on our Lord.

We might well cry out, with the apostle Paul, “What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body that is subject to death?” (Romans 7:24). But then, we might well rejoice with him when he answers that question: “Thanks be to God, who delivers me through Jesus Christ our Lord!” (Romans 7:25).


One Smooth Stone

Desperate to escape his past, the police, and especially, God, Alex Donnelly picks a good place to hide – the Yukon wilderness – but he finds even there his is pursued. What will it take for him to discover that no matter how far you run, God will find you, and no matter what you have done, God will forgive you?

Marcia Lee Laycock writes from central Alberta Canada where she is a pastor’s wife and mother of three adult daughters. She was the winner of The Best New Canadian Christian Author Award for her novel, One Smooth Stone. The sequel, A Tumbled Stone was short listed in The Word Awards. Marcia also has four devotional books in print and has contributed to several anthologies. Her work has been endorsed by Sigmund Brouwer, Janette Oke, Phil Callaway and Mark Buchanan.

 

To Every Book, A Season

by Marcia Lee Laycock, @MarciaLaycock

We’ve had a lovely fall season this year. For a time, the trees were resplendent in their golds and rusty reds.The sky remained a deep blue and the sun continued to shine. But lately the sky has darkened, and we’ve had some strong winds, winds that have stripped the trees of their colour and left them looking grey and forlorn. Of course, we know that winter is coming, and that spring will follow, dressing the trees once again in their verdant robes. It reminds me of Ecclesiastes 3:1 – “There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens.”

I know that includes this space of time I have been given now, to write. It is precious to me, especially as I get older, and I try to use it wisely but sometimes there are interruptions and barriers to overcome. All, of course are opportunities to learn, to grow, to seek God’s will in my life, to decide to trust Him.

Knowing that all things go the way of falling leaves also makes me realize that my life’s work, indeed, my life itself, is, as James 4:14 says, but “a vapor that appears for a little time and then vanishes away.” I try, therefore, to hold it lightly, to realize that it has purpose in God’s plan for a time and to value it as such, but then know it will eventually be gone. If I hold too tightly to it, treasure it too much, I will, in the end, be left with nothing.

Most writers have had the experience of finding their book on a remainder pile or on the shelf of a second-hand store. Even best-selling novels have a short life expectancy in this modern age. “The blockbuster novel is heading the way of the mayfly,” says Bob Young, CEO of Lulu.com, referring to the famously short-lived insect.

My first novel, One Smooth Stone, has recently been given a bit of a “new lease on life” with a new cover, so I’m hopeful that its life expectancy will be extended for a while, but still I know the end is in sight. It makes me a little sad, but when I look back on what I learned about the writing process, about myself and about God through it all, I realize it was a precious gift and I am thankful.

Besides, there are more books to be written, more words to put into articles and poems that may cause someone to pause and ponder the things of eternity. There is more to be learned about writing, about myself and about my God.

And the good news is that we can trust the One who has laid out the pattern of it because He “knows us best and loves us most,”(John Piper); He is the One who “rejoices over us with singing” (Zephaniah 3:17).

As there is sadness in this season of falling leaves, there is sadness in knowing that our writing has a rather short shelf life. But another spring is on its way.


One Smooth Stone

Desperate to escape his past, the police, and especially, God, Alex Donnelly picks a good place to hide – the Yukon wilderness – but he finds even there his is pursued. What will it take for him to discover that no matter how far you run, God will find you, and no matter what you have done, God will forgive you?

Marcia Lee Laycock writes from central Alberta Canada where she is a pastor’s wife and mother of three adult daughters. She was the winner of The Best New Canadian Christian Author Award for her novel, One Smooth Stone. The sequel, A Tumbled Stone was short listed in The Word Awards. Marcia also has four devotional books in print and has contributed to several anthologies. Her work has been endorsed by Sigmund Brouwer, Janette Oke, Phil Callaway and Mark Buchanan.