Observations . . .































by Nicole Petrino-Salter

Fantasy doesn’t sell in the CBA.

Male protagonists aren’t popular in the CBA.

Long novels aren’t desirable for the CBA.

The best stories/writing get published in the CBA.

Yes, I sometimes pick on the CBA publishers because, if we’re honest, each one of the above statements has been trumpeted by professionals in the CBA publishing industry. And each one of these statements has been disproven at one time or another. Not without cost to some of us.

The truth lies somewhere in the distance where reality has determined that some of the CBA houses had no idea how to market certain novels nor did some of them have the desire to try with fantasy. The common CBA demographic of women in a specific age grouping proved to be vocal protestors of anything they thought inappropriate or undesirable or just plain annoyed them. For this particular group, there was no read and let read. No, sir. Christian fiction had better stay within a mold that adhered to their theology and therefore their strict parameters for suitable material for their delicate eyes. And male protagonists often interfered with their requirements for enjoying anything romantic (go figure) while males in women’s fiction were considered trespassing in their worlds. Who cared what men thought about anything?

Long novels proved a little more expensive to produce so only well-known bestselling authors were given the luxury of having their long novels published.

The final statement to that short list doesn’t even merit an explanation. It’s simply not true. Anyone who’s read extensively in the CBA can testify to its unreliability. And it’s probably the single most polarizing reason for the boom in indie publishing. Good writers producing good stories are, were, and have been overlooked for so long, something had to be done. So independent, entrepreneurial spirited authors took to the tasks of publishing their own books. Ooh-rah! And bestselling authors decided to join them after discovering they could make more money doing so.

Just a few observations from the outside looking in . . .

Nicole Petrino-Salter writes love stories with a passion. You can find her here most days.