The World’s Great Literary Masterpieces — Freely Available at your Fingertips

Last week I asked about Readers. This week I’m curious to learn how many of you are using Project Gutenberg, which currently has over 25,000 free books online and over 3million downloads a month.

It’s absolutely brilliant for a historical novelist. I’ve used it to read Victorian housekeeping books, diaries, and research topics of interest. A quick search of my eBooks folder shows me some of the various subjects and books I’ve downloaded:

AN ENGLISH GRAMMAR, by W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell

1811 DICTIONARY OF THE VULGAR TONGUE, by Captain Grose et al.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND USEFUL PHRASES, by Greenville Kleiser

And I quote, “Practical Handbook Of Pertinent Expressions, Striking Similes, Literary, Commercial, Conversational, And Oratorical Terms, For The Embellishment Of Speech And Literature, And The Improvement Of The Vocabulary Of Those Persons Who Read, Write, And Speak English.”

LETTERS FROM ENGAND 1846-1849, by Elizabeth Davis Bancroft

THE CENTURY VOCABULARY BUILDER, By Garland Greever and Joseph M. Bachelor.

THE HOUSE OF THE VAMPIRE, by George Sylvester Viereck

SHORT STORY WRITING, A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE ART OF THE SHORT STORY, by Charles Raymond Barrett

THE LOSS OF THE SS. TITANIC, by Lawrence Beesley (a firsthand account that kept me as riveted as the movie)

et cetera, et cetera . . .

I suppose any non-writer would think I was grabbing all the boring ones. But it’s a gold mine for writers and researchers, not to mention a place to read the classics for free. They also have illustrated books, children’s botany, etc.

So do any of you guys visit Project Gutenberg? And if so, I’m curious what you’ve down loaded.